Finds Vintage

Rolex Veriflat 6512 in Rose Gold

Rolex-Veriflat-6512-Rose-Gold

As under-the-radar vintage picks go, most anything that says Rolex on the dial is out of contention. Today, I present to you what may be the sole exception to that rule which is also attractive. The 6512 Veriflat was an oyster-cased Calatrava equivalent that only ever sold in rose and yellow golds. There aren’t many vintage Rolex references around without significant scholarship about them. This is one. This a watch with room for an enthusiast to provide discoveries to the community. It had quite the short production run but has yet to pop in the same way that most underproduced vintage coronets seem to have. All the better for you and I.

Rolex-Veriflat-6512-Rose-Gold

The time-only ‘ultra-thin’ of its day, the 6512 was produced with an early, very svelt caliber 1000 (neat name, right?) that measures just 3.5mm high—or low rather. The first auto Rolex, the 2526, utilized a 1030 that is just a caliber 1000 with a rotor on its peach. In the context of a modern dress watch, I think the Veriflat fits the collector’s role perfectly. This is bolstered by its 34mm diameter and 9mm overall height. The watch achieved COSC spec and, in character, Rolex felt the need to scrawl this somewhere on its dial. About its petite seconds the text officially certified chronometer circles, later replaced by the standard superlative chronometer, officially certified. Dauphine, baton, and pencil hands were all used at various points. In short, it’s a highly varied and technically interesting reference that would only be worn by the kind of guy we all aspire to be. 

Rolex-Veriflat-6512-Rose-Gold

This example comes in with a spectacular champagne dial and luminous alpha hands. Its petite seconds text marks it out as one of the earlier productions. The inner minute track (as opposed to the outside of the dial) confirms this. It comes with a period signed clasp. I cannot comment on the originality of the bracelet or clasp, but at the very least the metal is matched. Very often these come on period correct but not Veriflat correct bracelets. The only bracelet I’m aware of is more a brick style. Its case is strong, the crown is correct, and the dial is gorgeous. I’m not sure about its handset lume, it does appear to be a bit minty if you know what I mean. There are grounds for further inspection by its next potential owner, but enough interest that I think it worth presenting here. It comes from a well-regarded Italian retailer with no box or papers. 

Find this Veriflat here from Romain Rea for an undisclosed sum.